Filming Locations Guide: Where was The Mandalorian Filmed?

The Mandalorian location
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The Mandalorian was almost entirely filmed in studios and large sets located in Los Angeles. However, the set designers take inspiration from many real-world locations. For instance, our research has revealed that the exterior desert landscapes were filmed in Death Valley National Park.

The Star Wars franchise ended an era with the release of Episode IX - The Rise of Skywalker. The Disney+ series The Mandalorian - a spin-off starring Pedro Pascal - continues exploring this popular universe set in a galaxy far, far away.

This galactic spaghetti western takes place five years after the events of Episode VI - Return of the Jedi. The story follows a Mandalorian mercenary warrior (like Boba Fett and Jango Fett), getting into trouble after bounty hunting a super-cute Baby Yoda, named Grogu.

The Mandalorian planet Tatooine location
In the very first episode, the spacecraft arrives at the Arvala-7, a remote planet where the Ugnaught vapor farmer Kuiil lives. The tall lighter pinnacle is the Manly Beacon and to the right is the Red Cathedral at Zabriskie Point. The myriad eroded mountain ridges of red and yellow are the delight of tourists and photographers alike. Located in southeastern California, this low and arid region also served as a filming location for Tatooine in 1977's Episode IV – A New Hope.
Image courtesy of Disney+ and Jim Choate - Map


Spacecraft flying over Zabriskie Point
Very few landscapes featured in The Mandalorian are real, although they are inspired by or directly taken from the real world. The production makes use of a new technology called Stagecraft created by Industrial Light and Magic. Everything is recorded in a studio set called The Volume. The actors are able to perform in a studio against a projection of the location where the scene takes place, instead of relying on the old green screen technique (and their imaginations).
Image courtesy of Disney+ and Jean-christophe Bruneau


The Mandalorian desert scenes
You can certainly find canyons and grottos in Death Valley that look like the one pictured. However, this slot canyon was inserted into the footage using Stagecraft. As posited by Slashfilm, this device could revolutionize the industry. Filmmakers can interactively change the projected world, the lighting conditions, or whatever else they desire, potentially rendering filming in a real location obsolete.


The Volume Stagecraft
Instead of the classic green screen, 3D images are projected onto ultra-high-resolution screens in real time as a backdrop for the acting. For the season two, the Volume was expanded, measuring a total of a hundred feet long and 22 feet tall (30x6.7 meters).


Volcanic lava planet
The lava field landscape in the Nevarro planet from the last episode of the first season could be footage from any active volcano in the world, but it looks like the 2018 eruption of Kilauea's volcano in Hawaii. This planet is not entirely disimilar from the Mandalore planet, the Mandalorians homeworld. According to Star Wars fandom Wookieepedia, Mandalore is located in the Outer Rim of the galaxy.


season 2 Location
In episode 2 of season 2, The Passenger, the Frog Lady has a thermal bath in some hot-spring travertine terraces that look like the ones found in Pamukkale (Turkey).
Image courtesy of Disney+ and Carlstead - Map


Tython Jedi Temple
The ruined Jedi Temple on Tython from Chapter 14: The Tragedy appears as a megalithic stone circle embedded in a landscape resembling the Texas Canyon near Willcox (Arizona) or the Alabama Hills in Sierra Nevada (California). However, this was the very first time that The Mandalorian was filmed on location. Cast and crew took over the Rocky Peak Park in Simi Valley to film the Boba Fett episode directed by Robert Rodriguez. By the way, have you heard of the Te Pito Kura magnetic stone on Easter Island? The people of Rapa Nui believe that this smooth spherical rock, considered to be the navel of the world, radiates some sort of supernatural energy (or force..?) called mana.
Image courtesy of Disney+ and Matthew Dillon - Simi Valley Map


Planet Morak
The planet Morak scenery from Chapter 15: The Believer looks like the lush jungles found in Hawaii. The dam-refinery seems totally inspired by the Imperial Star Destroyer-esque Tetsuo Harano Tunnels passing through the Ko‘olau Range on the island of O‘ahu, a filming location featured in the new Magnum, P.I. series.
Image courtesy of Disney+ and Casey Loagan Bassett - Map


The Mandalorian drehort
The production of this high-budget series created by Jon Favreau is hosted in the Manhattan Beach Studios in Los Angeles. Here is where were build the large sets used in the show, like the Japanese samurai-like settlement in planet Corvus from Chapter 13: The Jedi.

Can you help to improve this article about the filming locations of The Mandalorian? To complete and correct this report, any feedback, info or images that you may have are more than welcome, thank you!

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4 comments
  1. Yeah I thought the lava flow looked like Kilauea, too.

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  2. A quick drive down the road from Zabriskie Point is Twenty Mule Team Canyon. It's a short one-way dirt road where they shot R2 and CP30 trekking towards Jabba's Palace in ROTJ.

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  3. Some scenes was filmed in Cordillera de la Sal, Atacama Desert in Chile. Is funny because sometimes the cones of the andean volcanoes were erased and in others, not.

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  4. Episode S2 E6 location looked very similar to Texas Canyon near Wilcox, AZ

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