Cartoon Mountains: The Painted Hills in Oregon

To reassure you that these images are not the work of an illustrator, we must first compare these softly colored hills with their neighboring mountains, somewhat more ordinary. You'll find these antediluvian volcanic ash deposits, transformed into claystone over the eons, going inland in the state of Oregon, coming from the Route 26 from Portland.

Extreme erosion has shaped the slopes gradually, achieving this arched appearance, almost organic. Coupled with its dazzling range of colors, the Painted Hills makes for an unusual visual spectacle:

Painted Hills
Epic landscape. The Painted Hills wear their geological history in vivid stripes of color.
Image by Vijay Gunda


Oregon Mountains
Striking contrast. The out-of-this-world feeling is accentuated even further when viewed against the surrounding mountains. Image by K. Kendall




Painted mountains
Zoom in. A dome drawn on top of the knoll.
Image by Bejan


John Day
Surreal panorama. From afar some hills seem like sand dunes, but up close their more solid rock texture is revealed.
Image by John Day Fossil Beds National Monument


 John Day National Monument
Arid surface. Very few plants can flourish in these chemically incompatible soils and strong erosion, unlike in the adjacent hills. Image by Scott Butner



Painted Hills
Centipede in Wonderland. Alice should not be too far.
Image by Greg S



Cartoon Mountains
Painted Hills are part of the John Day Fossil Beds National Monument, established in 1975.
Image by Shankarr Kalyanaraaman


Colorful Mountains
Deep Red. Obviously, the colors vary according to the position of the sun, so it's worth visiting the park in different lighting conditions. Image by Scott Butner


Painted Hills Oregon
Organic look. Or a melted candle.
Image by Scott Butner


Sleeping giant
The sleeping giant. The fossils found in the strata of John Day include a wide variety of plants and more than a hundred species of mammals. Image by Scott Butner


John Day Fossil Beds
Since the late 19th century, these badlands were known for their valuable fossil deposits. The oldest layers date back to the late Jurassic. Image by Scott Butner


Imaginary planet
The imaginary planet. Since its discovery, places like this have allowed geologists, paleontologists, and scientists in general a better understanding of what the Earth was like thousands of years ago. Image by Kathy & Sam


John Day Oregon
The snow adds another layer of color.
Image by National Park Service


John Day Painted Hills
Animal skin. The dark, cheetah-like spots, are manganese deposits, an extra touch added by a fashionable Mother Nature. Image by Andy Simonds


Haystacks
The park is located in a large rural area with very few inhabitants.
Image by Greg S


American Colorful Mountains
This fence give us an idea of ​​the scale of the landscape.
Image by Liz Kasameyer


MontaƱas de Colores
We only know of a handful of colorful mountains in the world as impressive as these ones. The most amazing are certainly the Chinese of Zhangye Danxia, which you can visit by following this link.
Image by Liz Kasameyer





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